Denture

A denture is a removable dental appliance to replace missing teeth and the surrounding tissue. They are made to closely resemble your natural teeth and may even enhance your smile. A denture helps you to properly chew food and can improve speech and prevent a sagging face by providing support for the cheeks and lips.

There are two types of dentures – complete and partial dentures. Complete dentures are used when all of the teeth are missing, while partial dentures are used when some natural teeth remain. A partial denture not only fills in the spaces created by missing teeth, it prevents other teeth from shifting.

Removable Partial denture(RPD) for single tooth or several missing teeth

Alternative materials : Acrylic base

  • Affectionately known in dentistry as a "flipper"
  • The least expensive of all the removable partial dentures.
  • The pink plastic of the denture base is brittle acrylic, the same material used to make standard full dentures
  • For several teeth missing, wrought wire clasps might be added and cured into the structure of the denture base for better retention.
  • These are frequently fabricated even if the remaining teeth have existing decay or periodontal disease and their prognosis is doubtful.
  • If later in the course of treatment some of the existing natural teeth are extracted for any reason, new false teeth can be added quickly to the partial, maintaining the patient's appearance. - Inspite of the fact that they are considered a temporary solution, many people keep this type of appliance for many, many years, because as long as they are properly maintained, they look outwardly as good as the more expensive permanent appliances.
  • One of the neatest tricks that a flipper can do is to act as an "immediate partial denture". This means that the appliance can be made before the teeth are removed, and inserted immediately after the extraction of the offending teeth.

 

Cast metal framework RPDe

  • The framework is cast to fit the teeth. Since they sit on the teeth, as well as being attached to them, they are extremely stable and retentive.
  • The teeth have been altered slightly beforehand in order that the partial denture can rest upon them without interfering with the way the patient bites the teeth together.
  • The metal framework does not contact the gums. Thus, as the gums resorb, this type of partial does not sink with them and rarely requires relines.
  • Modern frameworks are cast from an extremely strong alloy called chrome cobalt which can be cast very thin and are much less likely to break than the all plastic variety. They are also much less noticeable to the tongue.

 Flexible framework RPD

  • Denture base is made from Nylon or a vinyl composite
  • It replaces the metal, and the pink acrylic denture material used to build the framework for standard removable partial dentures.
  • It is nearly unbreakable, is colored pink like the gums, can be built quite thin, and can form not only the denture base, but the clasps as well.
  • Since the clasps are built to curl around the necks of the teeth, they are practically indistinguishable from the gums that normally surround the teeth.
  • This type of partial denture is extremely stable and retentive, and the elasticity of the flexible plastic clasps keeps them that way indefinitely.  

 


Complete denture for all missing teeth

 What Does Getting Dentures Involve?

The process of getting dentures requires several appointments, usually 1-2 weeks. Highly accurate impressions (molds) and measurements are taken and used to create your custom denture. Several "try-in" appointments may be necessary to ensure proper shape color and fit. At the final appointment, your dentist will precisely adjust and deliver the completed denture, ensuring a natural and comfortable fit.

 1st Appointment

  • Oral examination
  • X-Rays
  • Molding of the upper and lower edentulous (toothless) ridges (gums)
  • Other parameters are determined such as the shade, size and shape of the teeth that will be placed on the new dentures

2nd Appointment

Decide how "long" to make the teeth - Determine the plane of the tooth setup (when you smile, the teeth should be parallel to a line between the pupils of your eyes) - Correct relationship of the upper and lower teeth so that when you bite together, the upper and lower teeth line up correctly using a lose fitting denture base and a rim of wax to approximate the position of the teeth.

 3rd Appointment

Wax try-in, the lab returns the loosely fitting tray from the second appointment with the actual final plastic teeth lined up along the outer edge of the wax rim 

The wax try-in looks just like a real denture, except that the base fits loosely on the gums, and the teeth are embedded in wax instead of plastic. This gives us the opportunity to see how the denture looks and works before we are committed to the setup.

4th Appointment : Insertion date

It is normal to experience increased saliva flow, some soreness and possible speech and chewing difficulty, however, this will subside as your muscles and tissues get used to the new dentures.

Dentures can be attached to dental implants to allow for a more secure fit of the appliance. Regular dentist examinations are still important for the denture wearer so that the oral tissues can be checked for disease or change. You will be given care instructions for your new dentures. Proper cleaning of your new dental appliance, good oral hygiene and regular dental visits will extend the life of your new dentures.  

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